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每日一词:brandish(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 19, 2019 is:
brandish • \BRAN-dish\  • verb1 : to shake or wave (something, such as a weapon) menacingly2 : to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive mannerExamples:Michael appeared before the town council brandishing a petition signed by 500 people asking the town to increase funding for the public skate park.“Our plates of crisply battered cod, chips and mushy peas and our drinks arrived and we set to. Atticus ate with his fingers…. ‘Do you know how to use a knife and fork?’ I said to him, purely out of interest. He said he did know and he picked them up and brandished them at me to prove it. The fork was in his right hand, the knife in his left. ‘Bravo,’ I said.” — Jeremy Clarke, The Spectator, 21 July 2018Did you know?Often when we encounter the word brandish in print, it is soon followed by a word for a weapon, such as knife or handgun. That’s appropriate given the word’s etymology: it is a descendant of the Middle English bra…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑August 19, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:hiatus(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 18, 2019 is:
hiatus • \hye-AY-tus\  • noun1 a : a break in or as if in a material object :gapbbiology: a gap or passage in an anatomical part or organ2 a : an interruption in time or continuity :break; especially: a period when something (as a program or activity) is suspended or interruptedb : the occurrence of two vowel sounds without pause or intervening consonantal soundExamples:“The bus service will run from Dec. 3 to Dec. 21 before going on hiatus for the holidays. Regular service will resume on Jan. 7.” — Alison Brownlee, TheHuntsville Forester, November 27, 2012“It’s a new era for pop/rockstar Adam Lambert. After a four-year hiatus from his solo career, during which he became the new frontman for Queen, the singer returned earlier this year with two new singles and the announcement of his upcoming fourth studio album Velvet.” — Stephen Daw, Billboard.com, 19 June 2019Did you know?Hiatus comes from hiare, a Latin verb meaning …

每日一词:tortuous(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 17, 2019 is:
tortuous • \TOR-chuh-wus\  • adjective1 : marked by repeated twists, bends, or turns :winding2 a : marked by devious or indirect tactics :crooked, trickyb :circuitous, involvedExamples:“What a cast! A tsunami of lawyers, such as William Evarts, Benjamin Butler and others swept over Washington with a vengeance, launching long-winded speeches—one lasted 14 hours—and tortuous explanations of policies.” — Sam Coale, The Providence Journal, 23 May 2019“Introduced to the Tour in 2012, the Planche des Belles Filles ascent immediately became a classic. Set up in the Vosges mountains, it is steep, tortuous and brutal, featuring a 20 percent gradient at the top.” — Samuel Petrequin, The Associated Press, 1 July 2019Did you know?Be careful not to confuse tortuous with torturous. These two words are relatives—both ultimately come from the Latin verb torquere, which means “to twist,” “to wind,” or “to wrench”—but tortuous means “wind…

每日一词:satiate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 16, 2019 is:
satiate • \SAY-shee-ayt\  • verb: to satisfy (a need, a desire, etc.) fully or to excessExamples:After eating three pieces of pie and one of cake at the potluck, Jamie’s sweet tooth was finally satiated.“While the battles between Shazam and his arch enemy Thaddeus Sivana … will satiate superhero fans, the emotional center of the movie is the Philadelphia foster family that embraces Billy.” — Brian Truitt, USA Today, 3 Apr. 2019Did you know?Satiate, sate, surfeit, cloy, pall, glut, and gorge all mean to fill to repletion. Satiate and sate sometimes imply only complete satisfaction but more often suggest repletion that has destroyed interest or desire, as in “Years of globe-trotting had satiated their interest in travel” and “Readers were sated with sensationalistic stories.” Surfeit implies a nauseating repletion, as in “They surfeited themselves with junk food,” while cloy stresses the disgust or boredom resulting from s…

又一个周五!

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每日一词:miscible(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 15, 2019 is:
miscible • \MISS-uh-bul\  • adjective: capable of being mixed; specifically: capable of mixing in any ratio without separation of two phasesExamples:Oil and water are not miscible—if you pour oil in a glass of water, it will float to the top. “Although the alkalized cocoa was not completely soluble in milk or water, it was more miscible than any other cocoa product, blending more evenly in solution….” — Deborah Cadbury, Chocolate Wars, 2010Did you know?Miscible isn’t simply a lesser-known synonym of mixable—it’s also a cousin. It comes to us from the Medieval Latin adjective miscibilis, which has the same meaning as miscible and which derives, in turn, from Latin miscēre, meaning “to mix.” Miscēre is also the ultimate source of our mix; its past participle mixtus (meaning “mixed”) spawned mixte in Anglo-French and Middle English, and mix came about as a back-formation of mixte. The suffix -able gives us mixable, thereby …

每日一词:garniture(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 14, 2019 is:
garniture • \GAHR-nih-cher\  • noun1 :embellishment, trimming2 : a set of decorative objects (such as vases, urns, or clocks)Examples:“Above the fireplace: a scene of a cow jumping over the moon, in an elaborate gilt frame. On the mantle below, we see a clock…, flanked by garniture sturdy enough to be a murder weapon out of Agatha Christie.” — Rumaan Alam, Slate, 23 Aug. 2016“Once upon a time, this was probably one of a pair of vases that comprised a garniture set used to decorate a Victorian mantel. Its mate has vanished into the lost and found of history, but this one with its superb craftsmanship remains a thing of beauty.” — Helaine Fendelman and Joe Rosson, The New Hampshire Union Leader, 29 June 2019Did you know?In Middle French, garniture meant “accessory.” It is an alteration of the Old French noun garneture, which is derived from the verb garnir, which meant “to equip, trim, or decorate.” In fact, an Anglo-Frenc…

每日一词:smite(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 13, 2019 is:
smite • \SMYTE\  • verb1 : to strike sharply or heavily especially with the hand or an implement held in the hand2 a : to kill or severely injure by so strikingb : to attack or afflict suddenly and injuriously3 : to cause to strike4 : to affect as if by striking5 :captivate, takeExamples:The cartoon’s villain was, as tradition would have it, smote by an anvil dropping mysteriously from the sky.“Down the street, Teresa Benner’s 1963, 23-window Volkswagen van was also turning heads. She bought it recently when it came up at a Barrett-Jackson auction in Arizona. She was smitten at first sight.” — Joel Mills, The Lewiston (Idaho) Morning Tribune, 23 June 2019Did you know?Today’s word has been part of the English language for a very long time; the earliest documented use in print dates to the 12th century. Smite can be traced back to the Old English smītan, meaning “to smear or defile.” Smītan is akin to the Scottish word smi…

每日一词:plaintive(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 12, 2019 is:
plaintive • \PLAYN-tiv\  • adjective: expressive of suffering or woe :melancholyExamples:“Dean Nicholson was pedaling up a hill in Bosnia … when he heard a plaintive meow. He looked over his shoulder. In the lambent December light, he saw a gray-and-white kitten chasing him up the incline.” — Isaac Stanley-Becker, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 4 Apr. 2019“[Stevie] Wonder did perform a plaintive cover of the John Lennon classic ‘Imagine’ for his penultimate number—a statement piece that he’s incorporated on his tours since the 1990s, and which he noted as being ‘still relevant,’ despite originally coming out in 1971.” — Mara Reinstein, Billboard.com, 25 June 2019Did you know?Like its relative plangent, plaintive is often used to describe sad sounds. “A plaintive wail,” for example, is a common use. Plaintive and plangent (along with relatives plaintiff and complain) ultimately derive from the Latin verb plangere, meaning “to…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑August 12, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:démarche(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 11, 2019 is:
démarche • \day-MARSH\  • noun1 a : a course of action :maneuverb : a diplomatic or political initiative or maneuver2 : a petition or protest presented through diplomatic channelsExamples:“On Feb. 23, less than a week after the U.S. démarche to the Cuban government, DeLaurentis accompanied two visiting U.S. senators … to see President Raúl Castro at the Palace of the Revolution.” — Tim Golden and Sebastian Rotella, ProPublica, 14 Feb. 2018“European Union foreign ministers … will also issue a demarche—a formal diplomatic protest note—to Moscow as early as next week over Russia’s continued detention of 24 Ukrainian sailors captured in the November incident, they added.” — The Washington Post, 25 Jan. 2019Did you know?When it comes to international diplomacy, the French may not always have the last word—but they have quite a few, many of which they’ve shared with English. We began using démarche—which in French can mean “ga…

每日一词:balkanize(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 10, 2019 is:
balkanize • \BAWL-kuh-nyze\  • verb1 : to break up (a region, a group, etc.) into smaller and often hostile units2 :divide, compartmentalizeExamples:“Tech companies and civil rights advocates warn that the increasing push by nations to create their own internet rules will Balkanize the internet and potentially lead to privacy violations and the stifling of political dissent.” — Cecilia Kang and Katie Benner, The New York Times, 7 Jan. 2017“Historical scholarship had become Balkanized into dozens of subfields and specialized methodologies, many of them virtually inaccessible to lay readers or even to specialists in other subfields.” — James M. McPherson, The New York Times Book Review, 19 Sept. 1999Did you know?The Balkan Peninsula of southeastern Europe is lapped by the Adriatic Sea in the west and the Black Sea in the east. It is named for the Balkan Mountains, a mountain range which extends from its border with Serbia …

每日一词:omnium-gatherum(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 9, 2019 is:
omnium-gatherum • \ahm-nee-um-GA-thuh-rum\  • noun: a miscellaneous collection (as of things or persons)Examples:“Muldoon’s Picnic—the critically acclaimed omnium-gatherum of music, storytelling, poetry, and more—has become a staple of New York’s cultural diet.” — BroadwayWorld.com, 4 Sept. 2018“In his diary, a small, haphazardly kept omnium-gatherum, Arlen set down axioms, vocabulary words, and quotes from a wide-ranging reading list—Marcus Aurelius, Aristotle, Santayana, Nietzsche.” — John Lahr, The New Yorker, 19 Sept. 2005Did you know?English abounds in Latin phrases. They roll off the learned tongue like peas off a fork: tabula rasa, ab ovo, a posteriori, deus ex machina, ex cathedra, mea culpa, terra firma, vox populi, ad hominem, sub rosa. Omnium-gatherum belongs on that list too, right? Not exactly. Omnium-gatherum sounds like Latin, and indeed omnium (the genitive plural of Latin omnis, meaning “all”) is the real…

又一个周五!

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每日一词:aggregate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 8, 2019 is:
aggregate • \AG-rih-gut\  • noun1 : a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another2 : the whole sum or amount : sum totalExamples:The university’s various departments spent an aggregate of 1.2 million dollars in advertising last year.“Their bill would require companies that collect user data to tell consumers and regulators what they collect, how they make money off it and how much it’s worth—in aggregate and broken down by users.” — James Condliffe, The New York Times, 1 July 2019Did you know?We added aggregate to our flock of Latin borrowings in the 15th century. It descends from aggregāre (“to cause to flock together” or “to join together”), a Latin verb made up of the prefix ad- (which means “to,” and which usually changes to ag- before a g) and greg- or grex (meaning “flock, herd, or group”). Greg- also gave us congregate, gregarious, and segregate. Aggregate is commonly employed in the…

每日一词:ransack(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 7, 2019 is:
ransack • \RAN-sak\  • verb1 : to look through thoroughly in often a rough way2 : to search through and steal from in a forceful and damaging way :plunderExamples:The kids had ransacked the cabinets looking for snacks, leaving not a chip or cracker uneaten.“Also in the spring, I bring the bird feeders inside the house to avoid tempting bears into our yard…. A resident bear only had to ransack my feeders once for me to learn my lesson.” — Aislinn Sarnacki, The Bangor (Maine) Daily News, 6 June 2019Did you know?Ransack carries the image of a house being roughly disarranged, as might happen when you are frantically searching for something. This is appropriate given the word’s origin. Ransack derives, via Middle English ransaken, from Old Norse rannsaka; the rann in rannsaka means “house.” The second half of rannsaka is related to an Old English word, sēcan, meaning “to seek.” But our modern use of the word isn’t restricted t…

每日一词:totem(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 6, 2019 is:
totem • \TOH-tum\  • noun1 a : an object (such as an animal or plant) serving as the emblem of a family or clan and often as a reminder of its ancestry; also: a usually carved or painted representation of such an objectb : a family or clan identified by a common totemic object2 : one that serves as an emblem or revered symbolExamples:The Delaware Indians of eastern North America belonged to one of three groups whose totems were the turkey, the turtle, and the wolf.“A totem reached the end of its life with a unifying ceremony after 65 years standing the grounds of Thunderbird Park. Members of First Nations … spoke to the significance of the Kwakwaka’wakw house post replica, which was built in 1954…. — Nicole Crescenzi, The Victoria (British Columbia) News, 31 May 2019Did you know?Totem comes to us from Ojibwa, an Algonquian language spoken by an American Indian people from the regions around Lake Superior. The most basic f…

每日一词:passim(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 5, 2019 is:
passim • \PASS-im\  • adverb: in one place and another :here and thereExamples:The old cookbooks that once belonged to Michael’s grandmother had some of her own recipes and other annotations penciled on the pages passim.“Finally, may I say that I respect the views of those who have read and researched the same information as I, but reached the opposing conclusion, as displayed in your letter pages passim.” — Stephen Brown, The North Devon Journal, 12 Dec. 2013Did you know?Passim is from the Latin word passus (“scattered”), itself from pandere, meaning “to spread.” Pandere is the root of the common word expand and the not-so-common word repand, meaning “having a slightly undulating margin” (as in “a repand leaf” or “a repand colony of bacteria”). It is also the progenitor of pace, as in “keep up a steady pace.” Passim itself appears in English both on its own and as part of the adverb sic passim, which means “so throughout…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑August 05, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:faze(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 4, 2019 is:
faze • \FAYZ\  • verb: to disturb the composure of :disconcert, dauntExamples:My grandfather was a stolid individual who was not easily fazed by life’s troubles.“The heat didn’t faze the crowd, though, as families swarmed up to Kirkbride Park to browse vendors and watch performances.” — Johanna Armstrong, The Fergus Falls (Minnesota) Daily Journal, 8 June 2019Did you know?Faze (not to be confused with phase) first appeared in English in the early 1800s—centuries after the works of Shakespeare and Chaucer were penned. But both of those authors were familiar with the word’s ancient parent: faze is an alteration of the now-rare verb feeze, which has been in use since the days of Old English (in the form fēsian), when it meant “to drive away” or “to put to flight.” By the 1400s, it was also being used with the meaning “to frighten or put into a state of alarm.” The word is still used in some English dialects as a noun meaning…

每日一词:silly season(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 3, 2019 is:
silly season • \SIL-ee-SEE-zun\  • noun1 : a period (such as late summer) when the mass media often focus on trivial or frivolous matters for lack of major news stories2 : a period marked by frivolous, outlandish, or illogical activity or behaviorExamples:“The St. Louis Blues have claimed their first Stanley Cup, officially ending the 2018-19 season and unofficially kicking off the silly season of trade speculation, draft gossip and free agent scuttlebutt.” — Chip Alexander, The News & Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina), 18 June 2019“I’m talking about the silly season. Remember the silly season? Every August, politicians would leave us all in peace and we’d have a blissful month of light-hearted, meaningless non-news.” — Michael Deacon, The Daily Telegraph (London), 11 Aug. 2018Did you know?Silly season was coined in the 19th century to describe the time when journalists face a bit of a conundrum: Washington is on sum…

每日一词:clarion(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 2, 2019 is:
clarion • \KLAIR-ee-un\  • adjective: brilliantly clear; also: loud and clearExamples:“The guitars take off like fighter planes and [Stef Chura] delivers a clarion, country-steeped vocal, somewhere between Kitty Wells and Kurt Cobain.” — Megan Reynolds, Jezebel, 3 June 2019“The commonest winter birds cheered me on: the chickadees and titmice, woodpeckers and jays, crows, cardinals, and sparrows.  And of course my clarion wrens.” — Jack Wennerstrom, The Bird Watcher’s Digest, September/October 1992Did you know?In the Middle Ages, clarion was a noun, the name for a trumpet that could play a melody in clear, shrill tones. The noun has since been used for the sound of a trumpet or a similar sound. By the early 1800s, English speakers also started using the word as an adjective for things that ring as clear as the call of a well-played trumpet. Not surprisingly, clarion ultimately derives (via the Medieval Latin clario-) from

又一个周五!

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又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑August 02, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:luftmensch(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 1, 2019 is:
luftmensch • \LOOFT-mensh (the "OO" is as in "foot")\  • noun: an impractical contemplative person having no definite business or incomeExamples:“People like Luftmenschen, and they’ve liked them for a long time. The image of Thales, called the world’s first philosopher, cannot be proven, but it’s comforting to think that intellectuals have their heads in the clouds and stumble into the well before their feet.” — Susan Neiman, Einstein for the 21st Century, 2008“Initially, antihero Shmuel Ash seems to be one of [Israeli writer, Amos] Oz’s more familiar types, a luftmensch, concerned with intellectual pursuits, sharing many of the dysfunctional and antiheroic qualities of his predecessors….” — Ranen Omer-Sherman, The Forward, 7 Nov. 2016Did you know?Are you one of those people who always seem to have their head in the clouds? Do you have trouble getting down to the lowly business of earning a living? If …

每日一词:importune(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 31, 2019 is:
importune • \im-per-TOON\  • verb1 a : to press or urge with troublesome persistencebarchaic: to request or beg for urgently2 :annoy, troubleExamples:“[Sarah] Polk feigned neutrality or loyalty, depending on what suited her, and she successfully importuned Andrew Johnson, the military governor of Tennessee and then American president, to pardon ex-rebels or to grant such favors as being able to sell her cotton untaxed.” — Megan Reynolds, Jezebel, 3 June 2019“For nearly 40 years, Houstonian Jimmy Dunne has importuned Texas lawmakers to ban corporal punishment in Texas public schools, to no avail.” — The Houston Chronicle, 18 Mar. 2019Did you know?Importune has many synonyms—including beg, entreat, beseech, and implore. Beg suggests earnestness or insistence especially in asking for a favor (“the children begged to stay up late”). Entreat implies an effort to persuade or to overcome resistance (“she entreated him to change h…

每日一词:phalanx(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 30, 2019 is:
phalanx • \FAY-lanks\  • noun1 : a body of heavily armed infantry in ancient Greece formed in close deep ranks and files; broadly: a body of troops in close array2 : one of the digital bones of the hand or foot of a vertebrate3 a : a massed arrangement of persons, animals, or thingsb : an organized body of personsExamples:“Despite Beyoncé missing in action, Skylar Grey filled her shoes admirably, as she sang the hook and played the piano. In addition to Grey, a phalanx of violinists helped anchor the heartfelt performance.” — Carl Lamarre, Billboard.com, 12 Nov. 2017“This specimen … is the middle phalanx of a human middle finger. It was collected from the Nefud desert of Saudi Arabia by Huw Groucutt of Oxford University and his colleagues. In a paper just published in Nature Ecology & Evolution they report that uranium-thorium isotopic dating suggests it is 88,000 years old….” — The Economist, 14 Apr. 2018Did you know?

每日一词:addlepated(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 29, 2019 is:
addlepated • \AD-ul-pay-tud\  • adjective1 : being mixed up :confused2 :eccentricExamples:“Her addlepated mind flitted butterflylike from one often unrelated subject to another.” — Tessa Harris, The Anatomist’s Apprentice, 2011“[Nick Park’s] best-known creations are the addlepated, cheese-loving inventor Wallace, and Gromit, his patient, intelligent dog. Park’s work helped to spark a new blossoming of stop-motion animation….” — Charles Solomon, The Los Angeles Times, 15 Feb. 2018Did you know?In Middle English an adel eye was a putrid egg. The stench of such an egg apparently affected the minds of some witty thinkers, who hatched a comparison between the diminished, unsound quality of an adel eye (or addle egg as it came to be called in modern English) and an empty, confused head—or pate. “Your owne imagination, which was no lesse Idle, then your head was addle all that day,” wrote one 17th-century wit at play with the word…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑July 29, 2019 at 07:01AM

每日一词:evince(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 28, 2019 is:
evince • \ih-VINSS\  • verb1 : to constitute outward evidence of2 : to display clearly :revealExamples:“Randall Park is solid, handsome, capable, and utterly charming—a leading man whose talents as sly foil to a larger, more outsized personality evinced by his performance in Fresh Off the Boat are given their full due here.” — Megan Reynolds, Jezebel, 3 June 2019“Famous for getting the first humans to the moon, the Apollo 11 command module is astoundingly small and unrefined yet evinces our innate desire to reach uninhabitable territories.” — Lydia Kallipoliti, quoted in The Atlantic, 18 Sept. 2018Did you know?Let us conquer any uncertainty you may have about the history of evince. It derives from Latin evincere, meaning “to vanquish” or “to win a point,” and can be further traced to vincere, Latin for “to conquer.” In the early 1600s, evince was sometimes used in the senses “to subdue” or “to convict of error,” meanings e…

每日一词:bildungsroman(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 27, 2019 is:
bildungsroman • \BIL-doonks-roh-mahn\  • noun: a novel about the moral and psychological growth of the main characterExamples:“It’s a thoroughly contemporary bildungsroman in which the protagonist is the Vietnamese-born son of an illiterate and violence-prone single mother. He’s living in the United States with her and his schizophrenic grandmother when he comes to terms with the alternating harshness and warmth of his family….” — Leigh Haber, Oprah Magazine, 3 June 2019“In its way, this is a very novelistic film, with the accretion of detail you might expect from a Bildungsroman.… We see what Cleo sees, we wonder what and how she feels, we build up our investment of sympathy with her, and it all leads to a heartrending payoff.” — Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian (London), 13 Feb. 2019Did you know?Bildungsroman is the combination of two German words: Bildung, meaning “education,” and Roman, meaning “novel.” Fittingly, a bildun…

又一个周五!

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每日一词:motley(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 26, 2019 is:
motley • \MAHT-lee\  • adjective1 :variegated in color2 : made up of many different people or thingsExamples:Many of the jesters at the medieval festival were dressed in a bright motley garb.“Geena Davis will guest star in the third season of ‘GLOW,’ the Netflix comedy series about a motley crew of female wrestlers.” — Lillian Brown, The Boston Globe, 11 June 2019Did you know?Motley made its debut as an English adjective and noun in the 14th century, but etymologists aren’t completely sure where it came from. Many think it probably derived from the Middle English mot, meaning “mote” or “speck.” The word is also used as a noun identifying a multicolored fabric, a garment made from such a fabric, or—perhaps the best known sense of all—the fool who often wore such outfits in the European courts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.Lake桑July 26, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑July 26, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:undergird(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 25, 2019 is:
undergird • \un-der-GERD\  • verb1archaic: to make secure underneath2 : to form the basis or foundation of :strengthen, supportExamples:“The organ tones that undergirded much of her recent work suggested a secular version of the church nave. Here, the walls close in and we’re transported somewhere deceptively plain, to what might be an afternoon recital in someone’s home.” — Thea Ballard, Pitchfork, 8 June 2019“We were taught that the right to vote undergirds all other rights, that free and fair elections are necessary for social progress.” — Stacey Abrams, The New York Times, 15 May 2019Did you know?The English verb gird means, among other things, “to encircle or bind with a flexible band.” When undergird first entered English in the 16th century, it meant “to make secure underneath,” as by passing a rope or chain underneath something (such as a ship). That literal sense has long since fallen out of use, but in the 19th c…

每日一词:hapless(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 24, 2019 is:
hapless • \HAP-lus\  • adjective: having no luck :unfortunateExamples:“Whatever your view of Team USA’s rout over Thailand or the way they celebrated every goal over that hapless opponent, the 13-0 opening victory fueled conversation and interest for Sunday’s United States-Chile match.” — Phil Rosenthal, The Chicago Tribune, 18 June 2019“David Bareford got into violence design when he was living in Chicago and struggling along as ‘an OK actor in a town where there were a million OK actors….’ He decided not to fight those odds; instead he embraced the stage-combat skills that came from acting in Shakespeare tragedies, which usually involve kings, soldiers and other hapless figures eagerly running one another through.” — Scott Hewitt, The Columbian (Vancouver, Washington), 13 June 2019Did you know?Hapless literally means what you’d expect it to mean: “without hap”—hap being another word for fortune or luck. Hap derives from …

每日一词:desideratum(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 23, 2019 is:
desideratum • \dih-sid-uh-RAH-tum\  • noun: something desired as essentialExamples:“The strength of his class depended to some extent on sound money management—but depended to a much larger extent on marriages based cynically on the sorts of children likely to be produced. Healthy, charming, wise children were the desiderata.” — Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., The Sirens of Titan, 1959“The year was 1953, and most American children were secretly wishing, praying and writing letters to Santa Claus promising to be nice rather than naughty in return for that ultimate desideratum of gifts: the ‘real, live pony.'” — Ken Jennings, The Petoskey (Michigan) News-Review, 24 Dec. 2014Did you know?We’d like to introduce you to some close cousins of the common word desire. All trace their roots to the Latin sīder-, or sīdus, which has historically been understood to mean “heavenly body,” but which may also have an older, non-celestial meaning o…

每日一词:whinge(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 22, 2019 is:
whinge • \WINJ\  • verbBritish: to complain fretfully :whineExamples:“I was angry, I went home to my wife and I complained. I was whinging an Olympic level of whinging to Deb, my wife, and moaning about this person and that person.” — Hugh Jackman, quoted in MailOnline, 4 June 2019“For those who whinged that the Freddie Mercury biopic ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ played fast and loose with the facts and the timeline—and I was one—it must be said that director Dexter Fletcher’s Elton John movie ‘Rocketman’ takes even more liberties with truth.” — Jim Sullivan, WBUR.org, 31 May 2019Did you know?Whinge isn’t a simple spelling variant of whine. Whinge and whine are actually entirely different words with separate histories. Whine traces to an Old English verb, hwinan, which means “to make a humming or whirring sound.” When hwinan became whinen in Middle English, it meant “to wail distressfully”; whine didn’t acquire its “complain” sense…

数学相关:求抽象函数定义域

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原文链接初中我们就接触过函数,现在我们把它用高中的语言再说一遍。设是两个给定的非空数集,按照某种确定的对应关系,使得对于集合中的任意一个数,在集合中都有唯一的数与之对应,我们把这种对应叫做从集合到集合的一个函数,记作,若省略定义域,则指使函数有意义的一切实数所组成的集合。函数有两种形式,一种是具体的,即有解析式的,另一种是我们今天重点说的,抽象的,即没有具体解析式的。函数有三个要素,定义域对应法则值域。以及四个性质,单调性奇偶性周期性对称性。这篇文章会先把前三个讲掉。首先是三个要素。如果两个函数的三要素都完全相同,那么这两个函数相等。其中,定义域指该函数的有效取值范围,即使函数有意义的自变量的范围。一般来说,一个函数的取值范围都是比较连续的,可以用一个范围来表示。比如自变量从3到5,5可以取到而3取不到,就可以写成,或者使用区间来表示就是。如果19以上的值都可以取并且包括19,区间就可以写成。即任意描述法中的条件是不等式的集合,都可以写成一个区间。一个不等式中,不带等号的一端用圆括号(小括号),带等号的一端用方括号(中括号)。特别地无穷的那一端只用圆括号[1]。实数集就可以表示为。但是如果一个函数的取值不连续,比如从1到2,从5到6都可以,其中2和5可以取,但是其他不行,此时一个区间便不行了,我们要用集合的运算,并集运算,来表示,即。对于则可以写为。[1]:Photomath中使用尖角括号。不同国家可能有不同标准。如果我们知道了一个函数的解析式,我们可以直接观察表达式。初中学过的共有三个:分式中的分母不为零偶次根式的被开方数大于等于零零次幂的底数不为零比如求函数的定义域。:观察可得。解得。现在我们来思考一个问题。设,可得。代入两个代数式,可得现在我们遮掉所有的解析式,可得中的取值范围,同时也是中的取值范围。有必要注意的是,定义域是指的取值范围,所以我们要从的范围中反推出一个关于的不等式,再将其替换为。比如,已知函数的定义域为,求的定义域。:的定义域为解得的定义域为