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每日一词:incongruous(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 14, 2019 is:
incongruous • \in-KAHN-gruh-wus\  • adjective: lacking congruity: asa : not harmonious:incompatibleb : not conforming:disagreeingc : inconsistent within itselfd : lacking propriety:unsuitableExamples:The sight of a horse and carriage amongst the cars on the road was a bit incongruous.“The gunplay scene was so incongruous with the rest of the film that one wonders if [director Michael] Engler added the assassination storyline to simply beef up the movie’s runtime.” — John Vaaler, The Middlebury (Vermont) Campus, 3 Oct. 2019Did you know?Incongruous is a spin-off of its antonym, congruous, which means “in agreement, harmony, or correspondence.” Etymologists are in agreement about the origin of both words: they trace to the Latin congruus, from the verb congruere, which means “to come together” or “to agree.” The dates of these words’ first uses in English match up pretty well, too. Both words are first known to have appea…

每日一词:gambit(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 13, 2019 is:
gambit • \GAM-bit\  • noun1 : a chess opening in which a player risks one or more pawns or a minor piece to gain an advantage in position2 a (1) : a remark intended to start a conversation or make a telling point  (2) :topicb : a calculated move :stratagemExamples:“The tournament, first held in 1934, was Roberts’s gambit for attracting attention, members, and money. He persuaded Jones to come out of retirement to compete in it—an instant lure to fans and players alike—but at first Jones wouldn’t agree to calling it the Masters, finding the word too grandiose.” — Nick Paumgarten, The New Yorker, 24 June 2019“Obviously, most suspense novels rely on keeping the reader in the dark about something. But a big, glaring omission in what is presented as first-person interior monologue—as if the person is redacting their own thoughts—is one of the least impressive gambits.” — The Kirkus Reviews, 15 June 2019Did you know?In 1656,…

每日一词:bruit(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 12, 2019 is:
bruit • \BROOT\  • verb:report, rumor — usually used with aboutExamples:“Analysts have bruited about the notion that Comcast and Disney might team up and divide Fox’s assets to prevent a drawn-out bidding war—a turn of events that Mr. Iger has dismissed.” — Edmund Lee, The New York Times, 20 June 2018“In the new bio-pic ‘Judy,’ Renée Zellweger stars as Judy Garland…. The narrowly focussed yet emotionally expansive film has been bruited about as a likely springboard for a statuette for its lead actress ever since the movie’s première, last month, at the Telluride Film Festival.” — Richard Brody, The New Yorker, Sept. 25, 2019Did you know?Back in the days of Middle English, the Anglo-French noun bruit, meaning “clamor” or “noise,” rattled into English. Soon English speakers were also using it to mean “report” or “rumor” (it was applied especially to favorable reports). They also began using bruit the way the verb noise w…

每日一词:armistice(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 11, 2019 is:
armistice • \AHR-muh-stus\  • noun: temporary stopping of open acts of warfare by agreement between the opponents :truceExamples:The Korean War ended with an armistice signed in July of 1953, though a permanent peace accord was never reached.“[Ralph] Bunche, a Howard University professor, was an African-American scholar and diplomat who achieved prominence in 1949 after negotiating armistice agreements between Israel and four Arab states, for which he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.” — Richard Freedman, The Vallejo (California) Times-Herald, 24 Sept. 2019Did you know?Armistice descends from Latin sistere, meaning “to come to a stand” or “to cause to stand or stop,” combined with arma, meaning “weapons.” An armistice, therefore, is literally a cessation of arms. Armistice Day is the name that was given to the holiday celebrated in the United States on November 11 before it was renamed Veterans Day by Congress in 1954…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑November 11, 2019 at 07:05AM

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑November 11, 2019 at 07:01AM

每日一词:teleological(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 10, 2019 is:
teleological • \tel-ee-uh-LAH-jih-kul\  • adjective: exhibiting or relating to design or purpose especially in natureExamples:“The standard story about mass printing is a story of linear, teleological progress. It goes like this: Before Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press, books were precious objects, handwritten by scribes and available primarily in Latin. Common people … were left vulnerable to exploitation by powerful gatekeepers—landed élites, oligarchs of church and state—who could use their monopoly on knowledge to repress the masses. After Gutenberg, books became widely available, setting off a cascade of salutary movements and innovations….” — Andrew Marantz, The New Yorker, 23 Sept. 2019“A team of psychology researchers at Boston University (BU) asked chemists, geologists and physicists … to evaluate explanations for different natural phenomena. The statements included purpose-based (or teleological

每日一词:aphorism(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 9, 2019 is:
aphorism • \AF-uh-riz-um\  • noun1 : a concise statement of a principle2 : a terse formulation of a truth or sentiment :adage3 : an ingeniously terse style of expressionExamples:“Michael sighed…. He had known that his mother had told Gina that cryptic aphorism, but he’d long since forgotten and could not think why it had any particular significance, now. No more significance than his father’s cryptic aphorism: What are people for, except to let you down.” — Joyce Carol Oates (as Rosamond Smith), Snake Eyes, 1992“‘Brevity is the soul of wit,’ Shakespeare’s Polonius says, issuing the greatest unintentional aphorism in literature: at the time, scholars say, the line meant merely that concision is the essence of useful intelligence, and, of course, it was uttered as part of a deliberately long-winded speech. But it now captures … a subtler truth: a joke is improved by compression.” — Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, 15 July 201…

每日一词:lyric(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 8, 2019 is:
lyric • \LEER-ik\  • adjective1 a : suitable for singing to the lyre or for being set to music and sungb : of, relating to, or being drama set to music; especially:operatic2 a : expressing direct usually intense personal emotion especially in a manner suggestive of songb :exuberant, rhapsodic3of an opera singer: having a light voice and a melodic styleExamples:Critics are praising the novel as a lyric masterpiece that bravely lays out the emotional tensions experienced by its young protagonist.“Norgren’s encores were dazzling, as the cosmic cowboy tune ‘The Power’ combined psychedelic guitar lines and his headlong rush of lyric imagery careening into the chorus….” — Jay N. Miller, The Patriot Ledger (Quincy, Massachusetts), 29 Sept. 2019Did you know?To the ancient Greeks, anything lyrikos was appropriate to the lyre. That elegant stringed instrument was highly regarded by the Greeks and was used to accompany intensely p…

又一个周五!

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又一个周五!

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每日一词:espouse(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 7, 2019 is:
espouse • \ih-SPOWZ\  • verb1 :marry2 : to take up and support as a cause : become attached toExamples:“Tradition associates [the period of the Lyrid meteor showers] with the Chinese teacher and philosopher Confucius, one of the first to espouse the principle: ‘Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.'” — The Telegraph (UK), 10 Oct. 2019“The beloved musical [Fiddler on the Roof] was revived entirely in Yiddish…. Directed by Oscar and Tony Award-winner Joel Grey, the timeless show captures the strength of Jewish people and their traditions, while espousing universal themes of love, belonging and community.” — Madeleine Fernando, Billboard.com, 3 May 2019Did you know?As you might guess, the words espouse and spouse are related, both deriving from the Latin verb spondēre, meaning “to promise” or “to betroth.” In fact, the two were once completely interchangeable, with each serving as a noun meaning “a…

每日一词:chilblain(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 6, 2019 is:
chilblain • \CHIL-blayn\  • noun: an inflammatory swelling or sore caused by exposure (as of the feet or hands) to coldExamples:“If you thought chilblains only belonged in 19th century novels, think again. They crop up in response to extreme cold…. You’re more likely to get chilblains in extreme weather through sitting in an under-heated house or working in a chilly office than walking through sub-zero temperatures outside.” — JR Thorpe, Bustle, 7 Feb. 2019“Mrs. Goddard’s school was in high repute…; she had an ample house and garden, gave the children plenty of wholesome food, let them run about a great deal in the summer, and in winter dressed their chilblains with her own hands.” — Jane Austen, Emma, 1815Did you know?Given that chilblains are caused by exposure to cold conditions, it may not surprise you to know that the first element of this word comes from the noun chill. The second element, blain, may be less famil…

每日一词:posthaste(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 5, 2019 is:
posthaste • \POHST-HAYST\  • adverb: with all possible speedExamples:“You must leave posthaste,” Virginia theatrically admonished her guests, “or you’ll miss your ferry!”“These goats show almost nothing of the skittishness that we tend to expect of wild, hoofed mammals such as deer and elk, which almost always flee posthaste the instant they see a person (or, often as not, given the sensitivity of their senses, they smell or hear one).” — Jayson Jacoby, Baker City (Oregon) Herald, 9 Aug. 2019Did you know?In the 16th century, the phrase “haste, post, haste” was used to inform posts (as couriers were then called) that a letter was urgent and must be hastily delivered. Posts would then speedily gallop along a route with a series of places at which to get a fresh horse or to relay the letter to a fresh messenger. William Shakespeare was one of the first to use a version of the phrase adverbially in Richard II. “Old John of …

每日一词:sobriquet(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 4, 2019 is:
sobriquet • \SOH-brih-kay\  • noun: a descriptive name or epithet:nicknameExamples:“As a member of Congress, he voted against so many bills that he earned the ‘Dr. No’ sobriquet….” — Ben Terris, The Washington Post, 3 Sept. 2019“[H]e had a rather flightly and dissolute mode of conversing, and furthermore avowed that among his intimate friends he was better known by the sobriquet of ‘The Artful Dodger‘….” — Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, 1839Did you know?This synonym of nickname has the same meaning in modern French as it does in English. In Middle French, however, its earlier incarnation soubriquet referred to both a nickname and a tap under the chin. Centuries later, the connection between these two meanings isn’t clear, but what is clear is that the “nickname” meaning of sobriquet was well established in French by the time English speakers borrowed the term in the 17th century—and was the only meaning that was adopted…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑November 04, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:fraught(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 3, 2019 is:
fraught • \FRAWT\  • adjective1 : full of or accompanied by something specified — used with with2 : causing or characterized by emotional distress or tension :uneasyExamples:“Ruth didn’t think of herself as the kind of person who cared deeply about the outcome of a game played by fifth graders … but even she found it impossible not to get swept up in the excitement as the clock wound down, and every play became fraught with danger and possibility.” — Tom Perrotta, The Abstinence Teacher, 2007“… The 71st Primetime Emmy Awards … will be loads of fun for the nominees and presenters, and for the audience at home, but this one is fraught. With television in a state of flux that was once unimaginable—multiple new streaming services will launch between now and next year’s Emmys—and bristling tensions among writers, their agents and studios, there’s a lot at stake.” — John Doyle, The Globe and Mail, 20 Sept. 2019Did you know?“T…

每日一词:dilapidated(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 2, 2019 is:
dilapidated • \duh-LAP-uh-day-tud\  • adjective:decayed, deteriorated, or fallen into partial ruin especially through neglect or misuseExamples:Although extensive renovations would be needed to convert the dilapidated warehouse into apartments, Sam still thought it was a sound investment.“The 11-by-16-foot room is a sun-washed garret, taller than it is wide, on the fifth floor of a dilapidated 19th-century commercial building on lower Broadway that the artist has rented since January.” — Alice Newell-Hanson, The New York Times, 20 Sept. 2019Did you know?Something that is dilapidated may not have been literally pummeled with stones, but it might look that way. Dilapidated derives (via the English verb dilapidate) from dilapidatus, the past participle of the Latin verb dilapidare (“to squander or destroy”). That verb was formed by combining dis-, meaning “apart,” with the verb lapidare, meaning “to pelt with stones.” Othe…

每日一词:apocryphal(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 1, 2019 is:
apocryphal • \uh-PAH-kruh-ful\  • adjective1 : of doubtful authenticity :spurious2often capitalizedApocryphal: of or resembling the ApocryphaExamples:“The first official sighting of the creature dates from 1912, although apocryphal stories have the monster overturning the canoe of a Quapaw Indian and sinking a Confederate gunboat during the Civil War.” — Scott Liles, The Baxter Bulletin (Mountain Home, Arkansas), 28 Aug. 2019“In the chapter on cetology, we have to plow through a dozen pages of whale species, some of them possibly apocryphal, before we get to the payoff, a motto for freelance writers: ‘Oh Time, Strength, Cash and Patience!'” — Mary Norris, The New York Times, 26 June 2019Did you know?In Bible study, the term Apocrypha refers to sections of the Bible that are not sanctioned as belonging to certain official canons. In some Protestant versions, these sections appear between the Old and New Testaments. M…

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑November 01, 2019 at 12:01PM

每日一词:phantasm(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 31, 2019 is:
phantasm • \FAN-taz-um\  • noun1 : a product of fantasy: asa : delusive appearance :illusionb :ghost, specterc : a figment of the imagination2 : a mental representation of a real objectExamples:“In each maze, you will follow in the footsteps of the Ghostbusters—Peter, Ray, Egon and Winston—as they venture through recreated scenes from the film, including the firehouse, New York Public Library and the Temple of Gozer, as an army of ghoulish spirits, specters and phantasms attack.” — Devoun Cetoute, The Miami Herald, 17 July 2019“Finally I had to admit defeat: I was never going to turn around my faltering musical career. So at 31 I gave up, abandoning my musical aspirations entirely, to pursue a doctorate in public policy. … After finishing my studies, I became a university professor, a job I enjoyed. But I still thought every day about my beloved first vocation. Even now, I regularly dream that I am onstage, and wake to …

每日一词:respite(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 30, 2019 is:
respite • \RESS-pit\  • noun1 : a period of temporary delay2 : an interval of rest or reliefExamples:The station’s meteorologist had predicted that the bad weather would continue throughout the week without respite.“Such small, shady public spaces provide a welcome respite from busy street life and enhance the livability of the city.” — David Ross Scheer, The Salt Lake Tribune, 8 Sept. 2019Did you know?Respite is first known to have been used at the turn of the 14th century to refer to a delay or extension asked for or granted for a specific reason—to give someone time to deliberate on a proposal, for example. Such a respite offered an opportunity for the kind of consideration inherent in the word’s etymology. Respite traces from the Latin term respectus (also the source of English’s respect), which comes from respicere, a verb with both concrete and abstract meanings: “to turn around to look at” or “to regard.” Within …

每日一词:lackadaisical(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 29, 2019 is:
lackadaisical • \lak-uh-DAY-zih-kul\  • adjective: lacking life, spirit, or zest :languidExamples:“What used to be a bar with barely passable food, boring décor and lackadaisical service has a new incarnation. Everything has been improved, starting with its transformation into a lively tavern with a menu of popular comfort foods, as well as choices for more adventurous eaters.” — Marc Bona, Cleveland.com, 6 Apr. 2017“But it was not that they lost— … but how they lost, mired in lackadaisical play. Jose Iglesias was thrown out at third base trying to advance in a ball on the dirt for an easy out. Blaine Hardy forgot to cover first base. And then … J.D. Martinez caught a fly ball in rightfield and assumed Jason Kipnis would hold at third base.” — Anthony French, The Detroit Free Press, 8 July 2017Did you know?Alas, alack, there are times when life seems to be one unfortunate occurrence after another. We’ve all had days whe…

每日一词:undulate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 28, 2019 is:
undulate • \UN-juh-layt\  • verb1 : to form or move in waves :fluctuate2 : to rise and fall in volume, pitch, or cadence3 : to present a wavy appearanceExamples:“He could hear the muffled fart of a tuba from the German oompah band warming up in Feltman’s beer garden. Beyond the garden was the Ziz coaster, hissing and undulating through the trees with the peculiar sound that gave it its name.” — Kevin Baker, Dreamland, 1999“Mats of bright green duckweedundulated in the slow current of the La Crosse River, reminding an observer of the shape shifting in a lava lamp.” — Dave Skoloda, The La Crosse (Wisconsin) Tribune, 4 Sept. 2019Did you know?Undulate and inundate are word cousins that branch from unda, the Latin word for “wave.” No surprise there. But would you have guessed that abound, surround, and redound are also unda offspring? The connection between unda and these words is easier to see when you learn that at some po…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑October 28, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:pedagogical(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 27, 2019 is:
pedagogical • \ped-uh-GAH-jih-kul\  • adjective: of, relating to, or befitting a teacher or educationExamples:New teachers will be evaluated on pedagogical skills such as lesson planning and classroom management.“If Americans agree on anything these days, it’s that our schools could be much better, and that internet culture is harming our children. I have a simple proposal to address both problems: high school classes on how to use the internet more effectively. By now the internet has such far-reaching influence that such a pedagogical intervention is called for.” — Tyler Cowen, Bloomberg, 2 July 2019Did you know?Pedagogical, which has the somewhat less common variant form pedagogic, was coined in the early 17th century from a Greek adjective of the same meaning. That adjective, paidagōgikos, in turn, derives from the noun paidagōgos, meaning “teacher.” The English word pedagogue (which can simply mean “teacher” but us…

每日一词:aerie(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 26, 2019 is:
aerie • \AIR-ee\  • noun1 : the nest of a bird on a cliff or a mountaintop2 : an elevated often secluded dwelling, structure, or positionExamples:“Cradled in the limbs of an ancient (unharmed) oak, the rustic Barn Owl Tree House is a cedar-paneled aerie overlooking the valley.” — Dale Leatherman, The Washingtonian, February 5, 2019“A quarter-mile uphill from a cul-de-sac…, there is a 30-foot-wide gate beyond which lies another place of mythic proportions …, a 157-acre hilltop aerie with a series of sprawling, manicured fields on an escarpment rising to 1,360 feet in California’s Santa Monica Mountains….” — Alex Bhattacharji, Town & Country, February 2019Did you know?English poet John Milton put a variant of aerie to good use in Paradise Lost (1667), writing, “… there the eagle and the stork / On cliffs and cedar tops their eyries build.” But Milton wasn’t the first to use the term, which comes to us via Medieval Lat…

每日一词:coruscate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 25, 2019 is:
coruscate • \KOR-uh-skayt\  • verb1 : to give off or reflect light in bright beams or flashes :sparkle2 : to be brilliant or showy in technique or styleExamples:“You can sense [Mickaline] Thomas’s affection for these ostentatiously fabulous women. They sport towering Afros, floral-print shifts, gold lamé belts…. Lips and eyelids coruscate enough to light the way at night.” — Ariella Budick, The Financial Times, 7 Nov. 2012“Think of the Amalfi Coast and visions come to mind of verdant hillsides brimming with pastel-color buildings reflected in the coruscating Tyrrhenian Sea.” — Sahar Khan, Vogue, 10 Nov. 2017Did you know?To help you gain a flash of recognition next time you see coruscate (or to prompt you when you need a brilliant synonym for sparkle), remember this bit of bright imagery by George Bernard Shaw, describing a centuries-old abbey: “O’er this north door a trace still lingers / Of how a Gothic craftsman’s fin…

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑October 25, 2019 at 12:05PM

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑October 25, 2019 at 12:01PM

每日一词:Noachian(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 24, 2019 is:
Noachian • \noh-AY-kee-un\  • adjective1 : of or relating to the patriarch Noah or his time2 :ancient, antiquatedExamples:“So you thought the weather of 2009 was a bit on the insane side, with a spring that seemed to last until fall and Noachian levels of rainfall? Not really, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center in Ithaca, N.Y.” — Thomas J. Morgan, The Providence Journal, 21 Nov. 2009“Elendil, a Noachian figure, who has held off from the rebellion, and kept ships manned and furnished off the east coast of Númenor, flees before the overwhelming storm of the wrath of the West….” — J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, (1977, posthumously)Did you know?Students of the Bible know that Noah survived the Great Flood by stowing himself, his family, and male and female specimens of every kind of creature on his Ark. Noachian is derived from the Hebrew name for Noah. Modern contexts find Noachian used in reference to…

每日一词:spoonerism(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 23, 2019 is:
spoonerism • \SPOO-nuh-riz-um\  • noun: a transposition of usually initial sounds of two or more words (as in tons of soil for sons of toil)Examples:“The girlfriend is part of the origin story of Ritt Momney [instead of Mitt Romney]. That was the name Rutter and his friends at East High School gave to the band they formed their junior year. There wasn’t much of a thought process behind the name, a spoonerism of Utah’s junior senator and the czar of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.” — Sean P. Means, The Salt Lake Tribune, 14 July 2019Spoonerisms … occur when the first letter or letters of at least two words are transposed to form a nonsensical or humorous new phrase. My favorite, from childhood, is the usher who offers to ‘sew you to your sheets’ instead of show you to your seats.…” — Caitlin Lovinger, The New York Times, 7 Apr. 2018Did you know?Poor William Archibald Spooner! That British clergyman and educa…

每日一词:fiduciary(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 22, 2019 is:
fiduciary • \fuh-DOO-shee-air-ee\  • adjective: of, relating to, or involving a confidence or trust: such asa : held or founded in trust or confidenceb : holding in trustc : depending on public confidence for value or currencyExamples:“A pet trust can be part of an existing trust or it can be drawn up separately. In a trust, you name the caretaker and you establish a fiduciary obligation for them to care for the pets in the manner and style you choose.” — Charlie Powell, The Moscow-Pullman Daily News (Idaho & Washington), 24 Aug. 2019“This is an essential piece of insider trading that many people get wrong. The key element of insider trading is not the information. It is the fiduciary relationship breached when an insider uses that information.” — Eric Reed, TheStreet.com, 5 Feb. 2019Did you know?Fiduciary relationships often concern money, but the word fiduciary does not, in and of itself, suggest financial matters…

每日一词:comprise(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 21, 2019 is:
comprise • \kum-PRYZE\  • verb1 : to be made up of2 :compose, constitute3 : to include especially within a particular scopeExamples:The city developers’ plans include a massive recreational complex that comprises a concert hall, four restaurants, two hotels, and a theater.“He said the city’s commission, currently comprised of three members but set up for five, is supposed to meet monthly but usually convenes only in times of need, which is rare.” — Kevin Duffy, The Morning Call, 29 Aug. 2019Did you know?Comprise has undergone a substantial shift in usage since first appearing in English in the 15th century. For many years, grammarians insisted that the usage of comprise meaning “to be made up of,” as in phrases like “a team comprising nine players,” was correct, and that comprise meaning “to make up,” as in phrases like “the nine players who comprise the team,” was not. This disputed use is most common in the passive co…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑October 21, 2019 at 07:01AM

每日一词:knackered(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 20, 2019 is:
knackered • \NAK-erd\  • adjectiveBritish:tired, exhaustedExamples:“Even the most perky 20-something is going to age, have kids and get knackered eventually. And like millions before them they will turn on their TV for respite, rescue, recreation and Ready Steady Cook as their lives unfold.” — Mark Ritson, Marketing Week, 14 Feb. 2019“There are usually some after parties, but I haven’t made them over the past few years as I’ve been knackered!” — Daniel Ricciardo, quoted in Forbes, 15 Sept. 2017Did you know?Knackered is derived from the past participle of knacker, a slang term meaning “to kill,” as well as “to tire, exhaust, or wear out.” The origins of the verb knacker are uncertain, but the word is perhaps related to an older noun knacker, which originally referred to a harness-maker or saddlemaker, and later referred to a buyer of animals no longer able to do farm work (or their carcasses) as well as to a buyer of old…

每日一词:deke(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 19, 2019 is:
deke • \DEEK\  • verb: to fake an opponent out of position (as in ice hockey)Examples:“[Carl Yastrzemski] led the league in (outfield) assists seven times. He was great at deking the runner into thinking he’d catch the ball or it was over the wall. Most of the assists were on guys trying for doubles.” — Jon Miller, quoted in The San Francisco Chronicle, 13 June 2019“After taking a pass from Diego Rossi and avoiding a sliding defender, Vela stepped around another defender inside the box, deked keeper Daniel Vega to the ground then dribbled around him….” — Kevin Baxter, The Los Angeles Times, 21 Aug. 2019Did you know?Deke originated as a shortened form of decoy. American writer Ernest Hemingway used deke as a noun referring to hunting decoys in a number of his works, including his 1950 novel Across the River and into the Trees (“I offered to put the dekes out with him”). In the 1940s, deke began appearing in ice-hockey co…

每日一词:hobbyhorse(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 18, 2019 is:
hobbyhorse • \HAH-bee-horss\  • noun1 a : a figure of a horse fastened about the waist in the morris danceb : a dancer wearing this figure2 a : a stick having an imitation horse’s head at one end that a child pretends to rideb :rocking horsec : a toy horse suspended by springs from a frame3 a : a topic to which one constantly revertsb : a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation engaged in especially for relaxation :hobbyExamples:“Apologies for hopping back on my hobbyhorse, but the lifeblood of every program is recruiting. The first thing Tech’s next coach must do is rustle up pro-style quarterbacks and tight ends because, for 11 years, Tech hasn’t had one.” — Mark Bradley, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 28 Nov. 2018“When a man gives himself up to the government of a ruling passion,—or, in other words, when his Hobby-Horse grows headstrong,—farewell cool reason and fair discretion.” — Laurence Sterne, The Life and O…

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑October 18, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:maunder(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 17, 2019 is:
maunder • \MAWN-der\  • verb1 :chiefly British:grumble2 : to wander slowly and idly3 : to speak indistinctly or disconnectedlyExamples:The bed-and-breakfast was delightful but we felt a bit captive in the morning as our host maundered on while we hovered at the door, hoping to escape before the morning had passed.“Listening to [Kenneth Branagh playing Hercule Poirot] feels like chatting with your neighbor over the garden hedge, and it’s all too easy to be distracted by the foliage, I’m afraid, as he maunders on about knife wounds and sleeping potions and missing kimonos.” — Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, 20 Nov. 2017Did you know?Maunder looks a lot like meander, and that’s not all the two words have in common—both mean “to wander aimlessly,” either physically or in speech. Some critics have suggested that while meander can describe a person’s verbal and physical rambling, in addition to the wanderings of things like path…

每日一词:genial(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 16, 2019 is:
genial • \JEE-nee-ul\  • adjective1 : favorable to growth or comfort :mild2 : marked by or freely expressing sympathy or friendliness3 : displaying or marked by geniusExamples:“What country seems more sensible? The even discourse, the reflexive politeness, the brilliant yet genial wit, that easy embrace of hellish cold: Canada is a rock. Canada is the neighbor who helps clean out your garage.… Canada is always so … solid.” — S. L. Price, Sports Illustrated, 12 Mar. 2019“… Sony Pictures confirmed that its upcoming Fred Rogers film will be called ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.’ The announcement came by way of Twitter…, with the studio again sharing a picture of its star Tom Hanks seated on a trailer stoop in character as the genial children’s programming pioneer—cardigan and all.” — Nardine Saad, The Los Angeles Times, 28 December 2018Did you know?Genial derives from the Latin adjective genialis, meaning “connected…