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每日一词:forsooth(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 5, 2020 is:
forsooth • \fer-SOOTH\  • adverb: in truth :indeed — often used to imply contempt or doubtExamples:“For sure and forsooth, that means savings for you, dear Renaissance-loving reveler, if you purchase your entry to the weekend-whimsical Irwindale festival by Jan. 6, 2020.” —NBCLosAngeles.com, 26 Dec. 2019“There is a man haunts the forest, that / abuses our young plants with carving ‘Rosalind’ on / their barks; hangs odes upon hawthorns and elegies / on brambles, all, forsooth, deifying the name of / Rosalind.” — William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 1599Did you know?Forsooth sounds like a dated word, but it is still part of modern English; it is primarily used in humorous or ironic contexts, or in a manner intended to play off the word’s archaic vibe. Forsooth was formed from the combination of the preposition for and the noun sooth. Sooth survives as both a noun (meaning “truth” or “reality”) and an adjective (meaning “true…

每日一词:solecism(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 4, 2020 is:
solecism • \SAH-luh-siz-um\  • noun1 : an ungrammatical combination of words in a sentence; also: a minor blunder in speech2 : something deviating from the proper, normal, or accepted order3 : a breach of etiquette or decorumExamples:“We meet at the stroke of midday on an autumnal day in his West London apartment, where I instantly commit two sins from the Common list: being on time and being Scottish. My host kindly overlooks this double solecism and has made a jug of what he calls rosé cup….” — Jan Moir, The Daily Mail (UK), 14 Sept. 2019“He even took private instruction in English, and succeeded in eliminating his worst faults, though in moments of excitement he was prone to lapse into ‘you-all,’ ‘knowed,’ ‘sure,’ and similar solecisms. He learned to eat and dress and generally comport himself after the manner of civilized man; but through it all he remained himself….” — Jack London, Burning Daylight, 1910Did you know?T…

哀悼烈士。

原文链接为了响应全国各族人民对抗击新冠肺炎疫情斗争牺牲烈士和逝世同胞的深切哀悼,而本站由于特殊原因无法启用灰色滤镜以示哀悼,本站将置顶此篇文章以响应2020年4月4日的全国性哀悼活动。仅以此文,哀悼那些为了疫情而牺牲自己的烈士们。Lake桑2020.4.3

每日一词:cocoon(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 3, 2020 is:
cocoon • \kuh-KOON\  • verb: to wrap or envelop in or as if in a cocoonExamples:Lily got out of the water and cocooned herself in a large beach blanket.“By the time the United States entered World War I, France and England had been battling the Germans, the Turks and the Austro-Hungarians for nearly four years…. America, cocooned by great oceans, saw the struggle as distant and obscene.” — Wayne Washington, The Palm Beach (Florida) Post, 23 Jan. 2020Did you know?Since at least the late 1600s, English speakers have been using the noun cocoon for the silky covering that surrounds a caterpillar or other insect larva in the pupa stage of metamorphosis. The word derives, via French cocon, from Occitancoucoun, which, in turn, emerged from coco, an Occitan term for “shell.” Linguists believe the Occitan term was probably born of the Latin word coccum, a noun that has been translated as kermes, which refers to the dried bodies of …

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑April 03, 2020 at 12:00PM

每日一词:pleonasm(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 2, 2020 is:
pleonasm • \PLEE-uh-naz-um\  • noun1 : the use of more words than those necessary to denote mere sense (as in the man he said) :redundancy2 : an instance or example of pleonasmExamples:The grammarian’s recent post discussed pleonasms, such as “past history” and “personal friend.”“Like most writers, I can be a stickler about language, but anyone who hangs out with me for long enough will learn that I favor a certain ungrammatical turn of phrase: ‘true fact.’ Technically speaking, that expression is a pleonasm—a redundant description—since all facts are, by definition, true.” — Kathryn Schulz, The New Yorker, 19 Dec. 2018Did you know?Pleonasm, which stems (via Late Latin) from the Greek verb pleonazein, meaning “to be excessive,” is a fancy word for “redundancy.” It’s related to our words plus and plenty, and ultimately it goes back to the Greek word for “more,” which is pleōn. Pleonasm is commonly considered a fault of styl…

每日一词:loon(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 1, 2020 is:
loon • \LOON\  • noun1 :lout, idler2chiefly Scotland:boy3 a : a crazy personb :simpletonExamples:“He eagerly races by local cop Tom … at 300 mph, unwittingly shedding magical blue hair as he goes. He also teases Crazy Carl …, the local loon who no one believes when he insists he’s seen a blue alien. If you didn’t know any better, you’d think Sonic wanted to get caught so he could have a family, friends, heck—a connection with anyone.” — Dan Hudak, The Monterey County (California) Weekly, 13 Feb. 2020“The third subscription … was Rolling Stone, the best introduction to counter-culture a 10-year-old could ever ask for…. I never understood the political writing, and I distinctly remember thinking Hunter S. Thompson was a loon. But when it came to the articles about musicians, I hung on every word.” — Shane Brown, The Quad-City Times (Davenport, Iowa), 27 Jan. 2020Did you know?There are a number of theories about the origin of…

每日一词:plenary(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 31, 2020 is:
plenary • \PLEN-uh-ree\  • adjective1 : complete in every respect :absolute, unqualified2 : fully attended or constituted by all entitled to be presentExamples:“The President always retains the plenary power granted to him by the Constitution to pardon or commute sentences, and does so at his sole discretion, guided when he sees fit by the advice of the Pardon Attorney.” — Nicole Navas, quoted in The Washington Post, 3 Feb. 2020“The UK is scheduled to leave the European Union this Friday once the European Parliament gave their assent to the Withdrawal Agreement in a special plenary vote on Wednesday.” — Aurora Bosotti, The Express (UK), 27 Jan. 2020Did you know?In the 14th century, the monk Robert of Brunne described a situation in which all the knights of King Arthur’s Round Table were present at court by writing, “When Arthures court was plener, and alle were comen, fer and ner.…” For many years, plener (also spelled pl…

每日一词:laissez-faire(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 30, 2020 is:
laissez-faire • \less-ay-FAIR\  • noun1 : a doctrine opposing governmental interference in economic affairs beyond the minimum necessary for the maintenance of peace and property rights2 : a philosophy or practice characterized by a usually deliberate abstention from direction or interference especially with individual freedom of choice and actionExamples:“Though often viewed as an age of laissez-faire, the Victorian period saw ambitious lawmaking. Much of this involved revising existing legislation: one result was the expansion of the middle-class bureaucracy….” — Henry Hitchings, The Language Wars: A History of Proper English, 2011“In the late nineteenth century, a new generation of economists, who had returned from training in Germany to challenge the laissez-faire orthodoxy of the American Gilded Age, gradually rose to prominence at Wharton. They argued that the government should intervene to address widening inequali…

又一个周一。

图片
原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 30, 2020 at 07:05AM

又一个周一。

图片
原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 30, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:quixotic(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 29, 2020 is:
quixotic • \kwik-SAH-tik\  • adjective1 : foolishly impractical especially in the pursuit of ideals; especially: marked by rash lofty romantic ideas or extravagantly chivalrous action2 :capricious, unpredictableExamples:“‘Amazon’ covers nearly a quarter-century of business history, from [Jeff] Bezos’ rise at a data-obsessed Wall Street hedge fund to his seemingly quixotic attempt to crash into the book business.” — The New Jersey Herald, 18 Feb. 2020“Gary Garrels, SFMoMA’s senior curator of painting and sculpture, needed about ten years to put it together, in part because Celmins, who turns eighty-one in October, is so quixotic about how, and when, her work is seen.”— Calvin Tomkins, The New Yorker, 26 Aug. 2019Did you know?If you guessed that quixotic has something to do with Don Quixote, you’re absolutely right. The hero of Miguel de Cervantes‘ 17th-century Spanish novel Elingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (in …

关于播客。

原文链接嗯,播客这种东西就是读着玩的(怎么说呢,这次播客我就是随随便便录的,效果音啊开头结尾啊都没有认真搞。而且已经很忙了,没时间更新博客了。那就这样吧。Lake桑2020.3.28

每日一词:derogate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 28, 2020 is:
derogate • \DAIR-uh-gayt\  • verb1 : to cause to seem inferior :disparage2 : to take away a part so as to impair :detract3 : to act beneath one’s position or characterExamples:“While one could argue that the phrase [‘OK Boomer‘] in itself derogates the very term used to describe an older age bracket of generational Baby Boomers (those born between the 1940s and 1960s), it would be more useful to examine how and when people use such a new phrase.” — Kameryn Griesser, The Battalion (Texas A & M University), 19 Nov. 2019“All jobs require us at some point to deliver bad news—whether it be a minor revelation such as a recruiter telling a prospective employee that there’s no wiggle-room in salary, or something major, like when a manager must fire an employee.… Our research shows that people are prone to derogating those who tell them things they don’t want to hear—we shoot the messenger.” — Leslie K. John et al., The Harvar…

每日一词:cordial(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 27, 2020 is:
cordial • \KOR-jul\  • adjective1 a : showing or marked by warm and often hearty friendliness, favor, or approval : politely pleasant and friendlyb : sincerely or deeply felt2 : tending to revive, cheer, or invigorateExamples:Even though we disagree with one another on many points, we have long maintained a cordial relationship.“Last Wednesday, three members of the Taste Test team had lunch at All City Grille…. The experience was wholly pleasant. The dining room is modern and clean, the student servers were cordial and efficient, and the food was well-prepared and well-priced.” — Dan Kane, The Repository (Canton, Ohio), 12 Feb. 2020Did you know?Cordial shares the Latin root cor with concord (meaning “harmony”) and discord (meaning “conflict”). Cor means “heart,” and each of these cor descendants has something to do with the heart, at least figuratively. Concord, which comes from con- (meaning “together” or “with”) plus co…

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 27, 2020 at 12:00PM

#01 Minecraft旧闻资讯 – 1.16

原文链接主播:Lake桑。此次博客用到了英文Minecraft Wiki的1.16页面的大部分内容。本次播客以CC BY-NC-SA 3.0协议发布。推荐几位Bilibili的UP:Xekr黑山大叔wuguangyao(广药),鬼鬼算测试播客,没录稿子。随便扯了一些私事。推广:Minecraft文言文语言包梗体中文资源包我们的网址:https://lakejason0.wordpress.com订阅地址:https://lakejason0.wordpress.com/category/podcast/feedLake桑2020.3.26

每日一词:ninja(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 26, 2020 is:
ninja • \NIN-juh\  • noun: a person trained in ancient Japanese martial arts and employed especially for espionage and assassinationsExamples:“Mando’s one-man raid on the client’s compound is lit darkly to better convey that our gunslinger can also operate like a ninja, but in the process it made the action there a bit harder to make out than some of the fight scenes from the two previous weeks.” — Alan Sepinwall, Rolling Stone, 22 Nov. 2019“Clyde was on the fire escape. As he ambled back and forth, preening, Boicourt grabbed a purple bath towel. She threw it over the bird and pulled him into her apartment. ‘I felt like a ninja,’ she said. The creature bit her, hard, on the pinkie.” — Katia Bachko, The New Yorker, 23 Dec. 2019Did you know?Ninjas may seem mysterious, but the origin of their name is not. The word ninja derives from the Japanese characters nin and ja. Nin initially meant “persevere,” but over time it develop…

每日一词:gibe(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 25, 2020 is:
gibe • \JYBE\  • verb1 : to utter taunting words2 : to deride or tease with taunting wordsExamples:“My PR firm introduced Tom and me, and I came ready to impress. I had read every piece he had written in the last five years. I playfully gibed him about obscure predictions he had made years ago in other articles, and was prepared to thoughtfully discuss his most recent column.” — Keith Ferrazzi, Never Eat Alone, 2005“‘Anybody who complains about the microphone,’ she gibed, is not having a good night.'” — Mark Z. Barabak et al., The Los Angeles Times, 27 Sept. 2016Did you know?Confused about jibe and gibe? The distinction actually isn’t as clear-cut as some commentators would like it to be. Jibe is used both for the verb meaning “to be in accord” or “agree” (as in “the results do not jibe with those from other studies”) and for the nautical verb and noun referring to the act of shifting a sail from one side to the other…

每日一词:timorous(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 24, 2020 is:
timorous • \TIM-uh-rus\  • adjective1 : of a timid disposition :fearful2 : expressing or suggesting timidityExamples:The study suggests that timorous people suffer from stress more frequently than their bolder peers.“Perhaps most disappointing was the 1935 ‘Mosaic Quartet’…, a collection of five short movements that the performers can play and repeat in whatever order they choose. It’s the kind of innovation that sounds intriguing in theory, but … they felt mild and even timorous in comparison with Cage’s much wilder spirit.” — Joshua Kosman, The San Francisco Chronicle, 20 Jan. 2020Did you know?Timid and timorous don’t just have similar spellings and meanings; they are etymologically related as well. Both words ultimately derive from the Latin verb timēre, meaning “to fear.” The immediate ancestor of timid is Latin timidus (with the same meaning as timid), whereas timorous traveled to Middle English by way of the Latin n…

每日一词:welkin(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 23, 2020 is:
welkin • \WEL-kin\  • noun1 a : the vault of the sky :firmamentb : the celestial abode of God or the gods :heaven2 : the upper atmosphereExamples:“If you stand in the trees you might see … owls, vibrant red cardinals and goldfinches lift into the welkin.” — Emily Clark, The Carver Reporter (Plymouth, Massachusetts), 25 June 2018“The night was dim, but not dark; no moon shone, but the stars, wan though frequent, gleamed pale, as from the farthest deeps of the heaven; clouds grey and fleecy rolled slowly across the welkin, veiling and disclosing, by turns, the melancholy orbs.” — Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Harold, The Last of the Saxons Kings, 1848Did you know?When it comes to welkin, the sky’s the limit. This heavenly word has been used in English to refer to the vault of the sky for centuries, and it derives from an Old English word meaning “cloud.” In current English, welkin is still flying high, and it is often teamed with t…

又一个周一。

图片
原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 23, 2020 at 07:05AM

又一个周一。

图片
原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 23, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:lampoon(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 22, 2020 is:
lampoon • \lam-POON\  • verb: to make the subject of a satire:ridiculeExamples:“From ‘Seinfeld’ to ‘Veep,’ I think [Julia] Louis-Dreyfus’ greatness lies in her ability to savagely skewer the ridiculousness of the men around her while simultaneously lampooning herself.” — Jake Coyle, The Washington Post, 12 Feb. 2020“Ultimately, Craig, a struggling mystery writer, comes up with what he thinks is the perfect crime, but not quite with the results he expected. That’s the premise behind Nick Hall’s Dead Wrong…. As a playwright, Hall isn’t afraid to lampoon the most hallowed gimmicks and creates a clever mystery about a man living off his wife’s fortune, a man who plans the perfect murder.” — Richard Hutton, The Fort Erie Post (Ontario, Canada), 12 Feb. 2020Did you know?Lampoon can be a noun or a verb. The noun lampoon (meaning “satire” or, specifically, “a harsh satire usually directed against an individual”) was first used in…

每日一词:incommunicado(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 21, 2020 is:
incommunicado • \in-kuh-myoo-nuh-KAH-doh\  • adverb or adjective: without means of communication : in a situation or state not allowing communicationExamples:Their government has agreed to give the Red Cross access to the prisoners who are being held incommunicado.“[Tommy Lee] Jones’ character is his father, a world-renowned hero astronaut who has been incommunicado for 16 years after venturing to Neptune on a mission to find signs of intelligent life in the great beyond.” — Soren Andersen, The News Tribune (Tacoma, Washington), 18 Sept. 2019Did you know?Incommunicado ultimately comes from Latin but made its way into English via the Spanish incomunicado. We borrowed the word (with a slightly modified spelling) from the past participle of the Spanish verb incomunicar, meaning “to deprive of communication.” The Spanish word, in turn, derives from the Latin prefix in- and the verb communicare, meaning “to communicate.”Lake桑M…

每日一词:fusty(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 20, 2020 is:
fusty • \FUSS-tee\  • adjective1British: impaired by age or dampness :moldy2 : saturated with dust and stale odors :musty3 : rigidly old-fashioned or reactionaryExamples:“She was there as an intermediary to translate the fusty old world of politics to a feisty new generation.” — Stephanie Ebbert, The Boston Globe, 13 Jan. 2020“In a city facing the extinction of that rather prickly creature known as fine dining, it’s nice to take a seat at GOMA and get properly coddled. Not, as you might be thinking, in a 1980-something, musty, fusty, rigid kind of way. But it has linen on the table, gorgeous crockery and service that’s slick and glossy—almost formal, but not quite.” — Tony Harper, The Brisbane (Australia) News, 12 Feb. 2020Did you know?Fusty probably derives from the Middle English word foist, meaning “wine cask,” which in turn traces to the Medieval Latin word fustis, meaning “tree trunk” or “wood.” So how did fusty end …

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 20, 2020 at 12:10PM

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 20, 2020 at 12:00PM

每日一词:viridity(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 19, 2020 is:
viridity • \vuh-RID-uh-tee\  • noun1 a : the quality or state of being greenb : the color of grass or foliage2 : naive innocenceExamples:The bright colors of spring training baseball, with its blue Florida skies and the viridity of its playing fields, annually gave Roger hope and comfort after a bleak New England winter.“Many single people wish they had a partner. Many married people wish they were single again. Oh, that grass, that fence, that trick of the light that alters the intensity of the viridity. We want what we haven’t got.” — Oscar Cainer, The Scottish Daily Mail, 9 Sept. 2016Did you know?Viridity is simply a highfalutin way to say “greenness” in both its literal and figurative senses. Greenness goes all the way back to Old English grēnnes, from grēne (“green”), a word akin to Old English grōwan (“to grow”). Viridity did not enter the language until the 15th century, when it was adopted into Middle English as v…

每日一词:abbreviate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 18, 2020 is:
abbreviate • \uh-BREE-vee-ayt\  • verb: to make briefer; especially: to reduce (a word or name) to a shorter form intended to stand for the wholeExamples:Due to time constraints, the last speaker at the ceremony had to abbreviate her speech.“New Mexico’s legislative sessions are abbreviated from 60 to 30 days in even years and limited in the scope of what can be considered.” — Patrick Kulp, Adweek.com, 9 Jan. 2020Did you know?Abbreviate and abridge both mean “to make shorter,” so it probably will come as no surprise that both derive from the Latin verb brevis, meaning “short.” Abbreviate first appeared in print in English in the 15th century and derives from abbreviātus, the past participle of Late Latin abbreviāre, which in turn can be traced back to brevis. Abridge, which appeared a century earlier, also comes from abbreviāre but took a side trip through the Anglo-French abreger before arriving in Middle English as abre…

每日一词:crwth(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 17, 2020 is:
crwth • \KROOTH\  • noun: an ancient Celtic stringed instrument that is plucked or bowedExamples:An Irish journeyman is expected to perform at the St. Patrick’s Day celebration; he is an accomplished player of the hornpipe and crwth.“Rae embarked on her first journey into songwriting and multi-instrumentalism with If Only I Could Fly [May 2013], featuring her prowess on fiddle, vocals, guitar and the crwth….” — Emeraldrae.comDid you know?Crwth, which comes to us from Welsh, is the name for an ancient Celtic instrument that is similar to a violin. In Middle English, the instrument’s name was spelled crouth before metamorphosing to crowd, a word still used in some dialects of England to refer to a violin. Crwth can also refer to a swelling or bulging body, and we can speculate that it came to be used for the instrument because of the violin’s bulging form. Other Celtic words for the violin also have meanings referring to ro…

每日一词:palpate(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 16, 2020 is:
palpate • \PAL-payt\  • verb: to examine by touch especially medicallyExamples:“Therapy, though, felt different to me. I found performing a concrete task with specific steps, such as palpating an abdomen or starting an IV, less nerve-racking than figuring out how to apply the numerous abstract psychological theories I’d studied over the past several years to the hundreds of possible scenarios that any one therapy patient might present.” — Lori Gottlieb, Maybe You Should Talk To Someone, 2019“A heel spur is a hard and usually painful area in the back of the heel where the Achilles tendon attaches itself to the heel bone. When the area is examined and palpated, there is a feeling of hard bone rather than the soft suppleness of the Achilles tendon.” — Robert Weiss, The Fairfield (Connecticut) Citizen, 29 Jan. 2020Did you know?Palpate has been part of the English language since the 19th century. It was probably coined from th…

又一个周一。

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原文链接 一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 16, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:minutia(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 15, 2020 is:
minutia • \muh-NOO-shee-uh\  • noun: a minute or minor detail — usually used in pluralExamples:The book argues that it is easy to get bogged down in the minutiae of everyday life and fail to notice important opportunities.“Bart has the soul of an artist, but his mind is like this steel trap of information that has details on everything from the minutia of legislation to the lyrics of every hit song that’s ever been written.” — Beckie Foster, quoted in The Tennessean, 10 Nov. 2019Did you know?Minutia was borrowed into English in the 18th century from the Latin plural noun minutiae, meaning “trifles” or “details,” and derived from the singular noun minutia, meaning “smallness.” In English, minutia is most often used in the plural as either minutiae (pronounced \muh-NOO-shee-ee) or, on occasion, as simply minutia. The Latin minutia, incidentally, comes from minutus, an adjective meaning “small” that was created from the verb…

每日一词:hoise(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 14, 2020 is:
hoise • \HOYZ\  • verb:lift, raise; especially: to raise into position by or as if by means of tackleExamples:“The closest Brennan has come to hoising the AHL’s holy grail has been the conference finals on a couple of occasions, most recently with the Toronto Marlies.” — Dave Isaac, The Courier-Post (Cherry Hill, New Jersey), 5 May 2018“The 6-foot-3, 228-pound Ole Miss receiver ran a 4.33 40-yard dash, posted a 40.5 inch vertical and hoised 225 pounds on the bench 27 times.” — James Koh, The Daily News (New York), 6 Mar. 2019Did you know?The connection between hoise and hoist is a bit confusing. The two words are essentially synonymous variants, but hoist is far more common; hoise and its inflected forms hoised and hoising are infrequently used. But a variant of its past participle shows up fairly frequently as part of a set expression. And now, here’s the confusing part: that variant past participle is hoist! The express…

每日一词:ambidextrous(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 13, 2020 is:
ambidextrous • \am-bih-DEK-strus\  • adjective1 a : using both hands with equal ease or dexteritybsoccer: using both feet with equal ease :two-footed2 : designed or suitable for use by the left or right hand3 : unusually skillful :versatile4 : characterized by duplicity :double-dealingExamples:“Holiday is ambidextrous. He is the rare basketball player who shoots jump shots with one hand (right) but prefers to finish inside with the other (left).” — Christian Clark, NOLA.com (New Orleans, Louisiana), 2 Dec. 2019“Miyamoto … also tells her he’s ambidextrous and can use chopsticks with either hand, so if they go out for sushi, she can sit on either side.” — Ben Flanagan, AL.com (Alabama), 5 Feb. 2020Did you know?Latin dexter originally meant “related to or situated on the right side,” but since most people do things better with the right hand, dexter developed the sense of “skillful” (as demonstrated by our word dexterous). I…

又一个周五!

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周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)Lake桑March 13, 2020 at 12:00PM

每日一词:retronym(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 12, 2020 is:
retronym • \RET-roh-nim\  • noun: a term (such as analog watch, film camera, or snail mail) that is newly created and adopted to distinguish the original or older version, form, or example of something (such as a product) from other, more recent versions, forms, or examplesExamples:“… first came paperback book, differentiated from a book with a cloth or leather binding, provoking the retronym hardcover book.” — William Safire, The New York Times Magazine, 18 Nov. 2007“You can get a good sense of the pace of change over the past century just by looking at the retronyms we’ve accumulated. New technologies have forced us to come up with terms like steam locomotive, silent movie, manual transmission, AM radio, day baseball, conventional oven, and acoustic guitar.” — Geoffrey Nunberg, Going Nucular: Language, Politics, and Culture in Confrontational Times, 2004Did you know?Remember way back when cameras used film? Back then, s…

Webhook测试。

原文链接应该还是不行。好吧可以。Lake桑2020.3.11

掌心的多洛。

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原文链接掌心的多洛。是多洛的钥匙扣啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊呜呜呜呜呜呜啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊啊哈哈哈哈我贴到了呜呜呜呜呜呜呜呜(这个人不是Furry,请放心。)Lake桑2020.3.11

博客联动。

原文链接大家好,这里是电量量。Lake 桑给我注册了账号,所以就来写篇文章吧。就这样。电量量2020.3.11

每日一词:Byzantine(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 11, 2020 is:
Byzantine • \BIZ-un-teen\  • adjective1 : of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient city of Byzantium2architecture: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine Empire especially in the fifth and sixth centuries featuring the dome carried on pendentives over a square and incrustation with marble veneering and with colored mosaics on grounds of gold3Christianity: of or relating to the churches using a traditional Greek rite and subject to Eastern canon law4often not capitalizeda : of, relating to, or characterized by a devious and usually surreptitious manner of operationb : intricately involved :labyrinthineExamples:“Unlike most Greek Orthodox churches in the U.S., though, St. Anna won’t have a traditional Byzantine dome. While that might seem unusual, Savas said, it’s hardly unheard of—there are churches in Greece that were built without that architectural f…

每日一词:escapade(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 10, 2020 is:
escapade • \ESS-kuh-payd\  • noun: a usually adventurous action that runs counter to approved or conventional conductExamples:“There was a report that people with spotlights were turning picnic tables on their end and using them for snow escapades on Pine Street and West Second Street in Cle Elum.” — The Daily Record (Ellensburg, Washington), 22 Jan. 2020“There was a dramatic escalation in the Senate’s milk-drinking escapades. We’ve written about the trial rules limiting beverage consumption in the Senate chamber to just milk and water, and over the past week several senators have been spotted drinking regular milk at their desks. On Tuesday, Senator Mitt Romney, an important vote in the trial, took it to another level: He brought a bottle of chocolate milk.” — Noah Weiland, The New York Times, 28 Jan. 2020Did you know?When it was first used in English, escapade referred to an act of escaping or fleeing from confinement o…

某个静态页面。

原文链接某个静态页面于最近发生了更改。就是这样。Lake桑2020.3.9

每日一词:devise(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 9, 2020 is:
devise • \dih-VYZE\  • verb1 a : to form in the mind by new combinations or applications of ideas or principles :inventb : to plan to obtain or bring about :plot2 : to give (real estate) by willExamples:The author’s childhood home was devised to the city, and the Historical Commission will turn it into a museum devoted to her life and her works of fantasy and science fiction.“There are efforts to devise an FDA-approved method for diagnosing concussion, including new blood tests, advanced brain scans, and systems that use artificial intelligence to read them.” — Scott Eden, Men’s Health, 12 Dec. 2019Did you know?There’s something inventive about devise, a word that stems from Latin dividere, meaning “to divide.” By the time devise began being used in early Middle English, its Anglo-French forebear deviser had accumulated an array of senses, including “divide,” “distribute,” “arrange,” “array,” “digest,” “order,” “plan,” “in…